My very first hackathon: UBC Local Hack Day

After a wicked snow day resulting in a cancelled final exam, the unexpectedly highest GPA of my life (so much for “not being a math person”), and abandoning my darling doggo to a Vancouver kennel (my heart breaks for her), I am finally nestled in snowy Ontario with family for a short winter break. I promised in my last post that I would write a little more often while I had the chance, so I thought I’d share my experiences at my very first hackathon, UBC’s Local Hack Day on December 3, 2016.

UBC Local Hack Day is part of the Major League Hacking (MLH) Local Hack Days happening worldwide. Instead of the more typical grungy 24- or 48-hour coding sprint, MLH Local Hack Days are a humane 12 hours long — much better! The organizers provided us with free snacks and pizza, and I even got some shiny new stickers for my laptop:

GitHub and MLH stickers on my laptop.
Sweet stickery swag.

Major League Hacking (MLH) encourages high schools and universities around the world to organize their own Local Hack Day, and UBC hosted one of them. At the same time that I was plunking away at my laptop in Vancouver, BC, students all over the world were doing the same thing. MLH representatives were at some of the larger schools — I think they were in New York, for example — interviewing attendees and generally sharing upbeat quotations and photos. It was pretty fun and lighthearted.

I had the option of joining a team and presenting my final project at the end of the hackathon, but I chose not to. Part of the Hack Day’s appeal was its non-competitive, celebratory and beginner-friendly atmosphere — I wanted the chance to hunker down and work on a personal project in a dedicated environment, without any pressure to actually finish, so that I could continue working on it post-hackathon (indeed, I’ve spent most of today working on it! More on this later.). The introductory speeches included quite a lot of talk about the MLH code of conduct and kindness, which I appreciated.

A few speakers stopped by. Susan Ibach, a Tech Evangelist from Microsoft, was back to talk about Azure and, like the last time I saw her speak, was pretty hilarious. Some students from the UBC Game Developers’ Association gave a helpful talk about version control and GitHub.

In hindsight, I feel like I could have gotten even more out of the event, but I just got too excited by, well, coding. Instead of taking the time to learn from the talks, or chat with the professional mentors, I put my head down and worked for about 11 hours straight. My head was spinning by the end! I think an important aspect of these events, especially since I wasn’t aiming to win a competition, is simply found in the networking. I completely missed that part.

My biggest regret is not staying to hear my peers’ presentations, but I just couldn’t tolerate sitting in that auditorium any longer. Hack Day went from 9am to 9pm; I left at around 7:45pm, right before the presentations began. I needed a break (and a shower).

My next hackathon is the Vancouver Game Jam in January, which is more traditional in length (48 hours!) and definitely team-based. I hope to learn a lot at this one since I’ve never actually developed a game before, but after my experience at UBC Local Hack Day, I also know the importance of taking regular breaks.

  • David

    Your blog is insightful for BCS applicants, so do keep writing! I’ve applied to the BCS program and I’m hoping to get in for Fall 2017. Do you believe taking math courses on Khan Academy helped you in your courses and Hack Day? Even though you didnt work with other students on a project, what was the project you worked on?

    • Caleigh

      Hi David! I definitely think that the math classes helped. The more math, the better haha. It didn’t help me at Hack Day, but it did help me in my MATH 200 course for sure. At the UBC Hack Day, I made a wxPython GUI to allow someone to create, edit, delete and save entries about their dog’s reactivity issues. I ended up scrapping it over Christmas and doing it from scratch as a web app with Django. It looks WAAAYYY better, allows users to log in/log out, and I added this neat JS graph that creates a pretty line graph based on the entries that the user has saved.